Personal tools
 
Views

Resolved: Hate crime enhancements are unjust in the United States

From Debatepedia

Revision as of 16:22, 9 February 2008; Limetime (Talk | contribs)
(diff) ←Older revision | Current revision | Newer revision→ (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

Overview

Definitions

A hate crime is a crime, usually violent, motivated by prejudice or intolerance toward a member of a gender, racial, religious, or social group. In this resolution, hate crime "enhancements" refer to a heavier punishment if a crime had been committed out of racial hatred or other prejudices. For example, normal graffiti would not be punished so severely, but if a swastika was sprayed onto a Jewish temple, there is clear racial hatred behind the crime and the person would be punished much more severely. This pertains to all other aspects of crime, i.e. a lynching would be punished much more severely than a regular homicide. The United States justice system does recognize hate crimes and punishes them more severely.


Argument

Affirmative

Hate crime enhancements are unjust because it punishes two equal results (i.e. assault vs. racial mugging) with different punishments.


No

Everybody is unique. It is important to note differences between people, and hate crimes help to emphasize each person's special qualities.


Argument

Yes

No

Argument

Yes

No

Argument

Yes

No

References:

Further Reading

External links

Wikipedia Entries

YouTube Videos

Problem with the site? 

Tweet a bug on bugtwits
.