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Debate: "Champagne" as only French

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(No)
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(Yes - question regional products)
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====Yes==== ====Yes====
 +There are very much products with a geographical name. (like Parma, Eau de Cologne, Edam cheese, Arabica coffee, Manchester (kind of cotton). If you want Champagne to be only produced in France, in the region called Champage, do you include the right of all other territorial products to be produced only in the region that is mentioned in the name of that product?
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''Click on the pencil icon and research and write arguments here'' ''Click on the pencil icon and research and write arguments here''
|WRITE CONTENT FOR THE "YES" BOX ABOVE THIS CODE width="45%" bgcolor="#F2FAFB" style="border:1px solid #BAC5FD;padding:.4em;padding-top: 0.5em;"| |WRITE CONTENT FOR THE "YES" BOX ABOVE THIS CODE width="45%" bgcolor="#F2FAFB" style="border:1px solid #BAC5FD;padding:.4em;padding-top: 0.5em;"|
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====No==== ====No====

Revision as of 06:52, 12 March 2008

Should the name "Champagne" be reserved solely for French sparkling wine?

Contents

Background and Context of Debate:

Should the term 'Champagne' only be used on French wine pproducts

Arguement 1

Yes

  • Champagne can only be produced through the methode Champenoise This method is neither fast nor cheap (like some other methods that simply add carbonation). The Champenoise method starts with a traditional still wine. Yeast and sugar are added after bottling, and then it’s sealed, so that the carbonation develops. It’s aged with the sediment—the lees. Then the lees are disgorged and the bottle is resealed.
  • Champagn should continue to come only from the French region of Campagn. Champagne is named after the region from which it was invented and continues to be produced. This is appropriate. The inventors of Champagne should, indeed, hold a claim to the name.
  • Calling sparkling wine Champagne diminishes the value of Champagne produced in France. If sparkling wine is produced in other regions of the world and is called "Champagne", the integrity of the image and value of Champagne that is produced in the French region of Champagn is diminished.
  • The EU legally secures France's right to the name Champagne


No

  • Calling all sparkling wine "Champagne" recognizes that the French invented it. The French have made a name for their invention, Champagne, so why not call that porduct by the same name all around the world?. This gives honor to their great invention. It also probably honors the French more than instituting laws that reserve the use of the name solely to French Champagne producers, whereby all other sparkling wine producers would give no name recognition to the French for their invention of Champagne.
  • Universal use of "Champagne" would promote French culture. Acknowledging that the use of the word Champagne gives some recognition to the French for their invention of sparkling wine, we can argue that the widespread use of the word "Champagne" helps France promote its image as a cultural leader in the world. Such a promotion entails subtle but important long-term benefits across France's high-culture, fine dining, and tourism industries.


Write Subquestion here...

Yes

There are very much products with a geographical name. (like Parma, Eau de Cologne, Edam cheese, Arabica coffee, Manchester (kind of cotton). If you want Champagne to be only produced in France, in the region called Champage, do you include the right of all other territorial products to be produced only in the region that is mentioned in the name of that product?

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No

  • Argument: The name "sparkling wine" cannot compete with "Champagne" Sparkling wine is often thought of as a cheap, poor quality version of Champagne. This is not the case. Part of the problem is that Champagne is a term that has been rooted into the public mind as a high quality bubbly beverage. Any alternative name simply does not have the same ring and marketability in the markets. It is unfair, after Champagne's image taking root for decades, to now expect that the other sparkling wines can make do with the name "sparkling wine".
  • Argument: Swiss village Champagne should be able to call its wine Champagne The French base most of their claim to the exclusive production of "Champagne" to the fact that it is produced in the French Region of Champagne. A town by the same name exists in Switzerland. It also happens to produce sparkling wine and calls it "Champagne". The French have successfully campaigned against the right of this swiss town to do so. But, it seems that a double standard is being applied, in which the French argue that the name of their town Champagne matters in the production of Champagne only in their case, but not in the swiss case. It is unfair for them to then succeed in pressing the EU to enforce the double standard, and in large part simply because France is more powerful than Switzerland.


Write Subquestion here...

Yes

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No

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