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Argument: Lifting US sanctions will not be a victory for the Cuban regime

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Brooks Lindsay (Talk | contribs)

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Current revision (20:24, 17 June 2010) (edit)
Lenkahabetinova (Talk | contribs)
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==Parent debate== ==Parent debate==
-*[[Debate:Cuba, Dropping of US Sanctions]]+*[[Debate: Ending US sanctions on Cuba]]
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==Supporting evidence== ==Supporting evidence==
*[http://www.freetrade.org/node/433 Dan Griswold. "Four Decades of Failure: The U.S. Embargo against Cuba". Cato Institute. October 12, 2005] - "Lifting or modifying the embargo would not be a victory for Fidel Castro or his oppressive regime. It would be an overdue acknowledgement that the four-and-a-half decade embargo has failed, and that commercial engagement is the best way to encourage more open societies abroad. The U.S. government can and should continue to criticize the Cuban government's abuse of human rights in the U.N. and elsewhere, while allowing expanding trade and tourism to undermine Castro's authority from below." *[http://www.freetrade.org/node/433 Dan Griswold. "Four Decades of Failure: The U.S. Embargo against Cuba". Cato Institute. October 12, 2005] - "Lifting or modifying the embargo would not be a victory for Fidel Castro or his oppressive regime. It would be an overdue acknowledgement that the four-and-a-half decade embargo has failed, and that commercial engagement is the best way to encourage more open societies abroad. The U.S. government can and should continue to criticize the Cuban government's abuse of human rights in the U.N. and elsewhere, while allowing expanding trade and tourism to undermine Castro's authority from below."

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Parent debate

Supporting evidence

  • Dan Griswold. "Four Decades of Failure: The U.S. Embargo against Cuba". Cato Institute. October 12, 2005 - "Lifting or modifying the embargo would not be a victory for Fidel Castro or his oppressive regime. It would be an overdue acknowledgement that the four-and-a-half decade embargo has failed, and that commercial engagement is the best way to encourage more open societies abroad. The U.S. government can and should continue to criticize the Cuban government's abuse of human rights in the U.N. and elsewhere, while allowing expanding trade and tourism to undermine Castro's authority from below."

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