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Argument: Undemocratic superdelegates may discourage future political participation

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  • Democratic Party strategist Tad Devine said. - "If a perception develops that somehow this decision has been made not by voters participating in primaries or caucuses, but by politicians in some mythical backroom, I think that the public could react strongly against that,” Devine said.
β€œThe problem is [if] people perceive that voters have not made the decision β€” instead, insiders have made the decision β€” then all of these new people who are being attracted to the process, particularly the young people who are voting for the first time, will feel disenfranchised or in some way alienated."[1]
  • Democratic Party strategist Tad Devine said'If a perception develops that somehow this decision has been made not by voters participating in primaries or caucuses, but by politicians in some mythical backroom, I think that the public could react strongly against that'The problem is [if] people perceive that voters have not made the decision -- instead, insiders have made the decision -- then all of these new people who are being attracted to the process, particularly the young people who are voting for the first time, will feel disenfranchised or in some way alienated.'
  • "But even some superdelegates are questioning the system, as the party heads toward the conclusion of a race in which they might determine the outcome.'It's not the most democratic way of doing things,' said Maine superdelegate Sam Spencer."
  • "Whether those superdelegates stay committed to their candidates, even if it means tipping the outcome of the race against the pledged delegate lead or the popular vote, could split the party."

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