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Argument: Internationalized education is necessary to producing global problem-solvers

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Supporting quotes from Economist Debate Series

  • peter hsu, commenter. Economist Online Debate Series. December 15, 2007 03:25 - "Very platonically imagine, after the stabilized stage of globalization movement has been reached, there will be no boundary of nations, people can select the environment and culture of his like on the Earth to enjoy his life. Before of this, foreign-student policy will always be the concerns of these nations of immigrated in and emigrated from, two opposite types of concern.
Once we could believe human evolution as well as economic growth has been more and more relying on scientific research and it applications that evolution has networked people into a smaller world; foreign-student policy is a kind of concentrating process. An intellectual concentration process will keep the momentum of the intellectual concentrated nations in higher evolution. This type of concern is their average citizen losing the opportunity to share the resources of higher education in a nation; especially the resources are shared by migrant students.
On the other hand, the nations of students emigrated from are losing the momentum of evolvement, especially those qualified students immigrated in the highly evolving nations.
Project the outcome of open foreign-student policy in a long run, also from the perspective of globalization, every nation and every people included in the other types of nations will also enjoy the advanced technologies derived from efficient scientific research due to intellectual concentration."
  • Art Teacher, commenter. Economist.com Online Debate Series, Education 2. December 14th, 2007 - "Right now our world is in a state of emergency, due to overpopulation, disease, pollution, and political strife. We really can�€™t wait to solve these problems, so it helps us all to give the best resources to the brightest minds, and this has to be our overriding concern �€“ not which country�€™s leading companies will earn the most dollars from such learning.The reality in America is that the leading barriers to higher education of our nation�€™s students are the lack of preparation and cost. Our k-12 schools are failing and this is the direct result. Blaming and limiting foreign students won�€™t solve our problems."
  • Roby Widjaja, commenter. Economist Online Debate Series, Education Debate 2. December 13, 2007 04:10 - "I am a pro to the idea that Governments and Universities everywhere should compete to attract qualified students, regardless of nationality or residence. Why ? [...] 5. Academic community should be a community which give an unlimited access to any kind of knowledge and culture of this world. We could not plant grape seed on corn field. If we want to grow global leaders, we should prepare the soil for it, an academic community which has a very diverse culture in it and, freedom of thinking and expression. Freedom and Democratic atmosphere is the very best soil for intellectual based industries."
  • Roby Widjaja, commenter. Economist Online Debate Series, Education Debate 2. December 13, 2007 04:10 - "I am a pro to the idea that Governments and Universities everywhere should compete to attract qualified students, regardless of nationality or residence. Why ? [...] 5. Academic community should be a community which give an unlimited access to any kind of knowledge and culture of this world. We could not plant grape seed on corn field. If we want to grow global leaders, we should prepare the soil for it, an academic community which has a very diverse culture in it and, freedom of thinking and expression. Freedom and Democratic atmosphere is the very best soil for intellectual based industries."
  • dishant sharma, commenter. Economist Online Debate Series. December 12, 2007 17:51 - "To servive in 21st century we want advancement in science and technology to provide solutions for betterment of human life and solution for global crisis on different issues.To develope such technologies we need smarter and intellectual persons in academia and research,those can understand the grassroot problem and contribute for solutions.So Universities and government have to focus on intellectual qualities of individual for better future and for growth of science& human race."...
  • meadmaker, commenter. Economist Online Debate Series. December 11, 2007 12:29 - "at a time when there is an indisputable need to tackle global problems, the over-riding factor should surely be to persons that have been endowed by nature with the best brains can exercise their talents in the best environment. As far as academic establishments are concerned, scholars have always disregarded national boundaries in their search for aquiring and exploiting knowledge. On this basis the answer must be to vote FOR the motion."
  • Frugal, commenter. Economist Debate Series. December 11, 2007 12:36 - "We live in a global village with all its benefits and faults. After we have mastered "the three Rs" in our national environment, it is essential that a wider range of knowlege is attained through international exposure. And not just of the academic variety. We need social and cultural life experience to prepare us for an ever more complicated world. Despite the costs and the inherent risks described by the Opposition, there can be no turning back. Like industrial health & safety, there should be no secrets in global education."
  • mkd2, commenter. Economist Online Debate Series. December 11, 2007 19:56 - "I vote Pro. In considering the opening arguments we must bear in mind that it is not all about discovering the holy grail by the best/brightest in the various scientific disciplines at a few select institutions, but also the numerous underlying 'sub-discoveries' if you will, that undoubtedly will occur in many many others. I see education evolving to become more thematic and clustered -- the best and brightest will migrate to where today's leaders are. Today's foreign student could be tomorrow's future leader literally anywhere in the world (and will attract tomorrow's best/brightest). The best and brightest will remain so, regardless where they choose to practice and their chosen field of study. The institution, colleagues, future students, industry, community etc. all stand to benefit on many levels from these individuals. Those institutions (in the larger sense of community) who elect to accept those best and brightest they attract will be long remembered and acknowledged. If we are truly talking of the best and brightest in the global context, advocating for attracting these individuals supercedes the economic argument in favour of the cultural 'for the good of humanity' one. In essence, there is also a huge potential for trickle-down effect of brilliance if we are really referring to the best/brightest in the broadest sense of the word."

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