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Actors:Carbon Emissions, Cap-and-trade versus Carbon Tax

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Where do the relevant actors stand in the following debate: Is a cap-and-trade system preferable to a carbon tax in reducing carbon emissions?

Contents

Introduction to actors page:

This section is for documenting the positions, or stances, that have been taken by the relavent players, politicians, organizations, countries, as well as position papers in this debate. It is not a place for arguments, analysis, or extended biographical information. It is purely for documenting the fact that a pro or con position has been taken by a certain source.

Bibliography of pro/con position papers in this global debate

Yes


Click "edit" and help research and document the stances of actors in this debate

No

Activists: Where do the key activist groups and individuals stand globally?

Yes

Cap-and-trade advocacy organizations:

Green organizations:

  • Environmental Defense supports a cap-and-trade system[1], which some think makes this group an "outlier" among "green" activist organizations.[2].

Labor leaders:

No

Carbon tax advocacy organizations:

Prominent activists:

Academics and economists: Where do the academics and economists stand and what are their position papers?

Yes


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No

See argument: The consensus among economists is that a carbon tax is the better approach

Think tanks: where do the different think tanks and their scholars stand?

Yes

The Center for American Progress supports a cap-and-trade system.

No

Journalists and newspapers: Where do the relevant journalists and newspapers stand on this issue?

Yes

Click "edit" and help research and document the stances of actors in this debate

No

Prominent and relevant journalists:

Newspapers:

International governing bodies: Where do international governing bodies stand on this issue?

Yes

Click "edit" and help research and document the stances of actors in this debate

No

UN: "UN considering global carbon tax", August 4, 2004

EU and European governments: Where do figures in the EU and its governments stand?

Yes

Actor:Germany advocates a global carbon trading system.

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No

Jos Delbeke - the top E.U. official on climate change He said on 4/1/07, "Emissions trading is a very solid second best [to a carbon tax]."[5]

Britain:

22 May 2005

United States government: Where do key politicians and officials in the US federal government stand?

Yes

American Conservatives - A carbon-trading system appeals to many conservative lawmakers because it fits into their general desire for letting the market determine prices instead of the government, while keeping revenue out of the hands of government.

  • John McCain - Said on 2/07[6]: "Any responsible climate change measure must have rational, mandatory emission reduction targets and timetables,” and it “must utilize a market-based, economy wide ‘cap-and-trade’ system." McCain co-sponsored with Senator Joe Lieberman the Climate Stewardship Act[7][8], which would establish a nationwide limit on greenhouse gas emissions and then issue permits to emit greenhouse gases.[9]

Paul Volcker, former chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve supports a carbon tax.[10]

No

United States Senators supporting a carbon tax:

  • Sen. Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.) has promoted a carbon tax (over a cap-and-trade system) in his campaign for the 2008 Democratic presidential race.[11]
  • Congressman Pete Stark (D-CA) and Congressman Jim McDermott (D-Wash) are the lead sponsors of the "Save Our Climate Act," which would impose a $10 per ton (of carbon) charge on coal.[12]

Other governments - Where do other governments stand in this debate

Yes

Click "edit" and help research and document the stances of actors in this debate

No

Businesses: Where do the relevant businesses stand on this issue?

Yes

Businesses often like the idea of a cap-and-trade system because it offers the flexibility of allowing businesses to figure out the least expensive way to reduce overall emissions:

U.S. Climate Action Partnership - consisting of ten big companies with a total market capitalization of $750 billion including DuPont, Alcoa, General Electric, and BP America - issued in January 2007 a "blueprint for a mandatory economy-wide, market-driven approach to climate protection."[13]

Business Wire, "California Companies Say 'Cap and Trade' is Preferred Method for Emissions Reduction", 12/4/06

No

A carbon tax offers the advantage of price stability to businesses: Ronald Bailey, "Carbon Taxes Versus Carbon Markets", 5/18/07 - "Although businesses — especially utilities involved in the SO2 market — might initially prefer a carbon market, the price stability promised by carbon taxes should eventually win most companies over."

CEO's that support a carbon tax:

Main pages for the 2007 Global Debates

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